Human Services Degree Program Curriculum

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

Program Courses

HNS100

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES

3

HNS101

SYSTEMS, PROCESSES, AND CASE MANAGEMENT

3

HNS200

COUPLE, FAMILY, AND GROUP MANAGEMENT

3

HNS210

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION AND ASSESSMENT

3

HNS212

HUMAN SERVICES VALUES AND ETHICS

3

HNS213

MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

3

HNS298

FIELDWORK I

3

HNS299

FIELDWORK II

3

Directed Courses (select FOUR from below)

CJS101

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMNIAL JUSTICE

3

CJS105

INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS

3

PSY103

EXCEPTIONAL CHILD

3

PSY210

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

3

PSY212

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3

PSY216

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

3

SOC113

ROLE OF PARENTHOOD

3

SOC200

CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES

3

SOC302

SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE

3

SOC303

DIVERSITY AND MULTI-CULTURALISM

3

SOC307

CRIMINOLOGY

3

SOC397

RESEARCH METHODS

3

General Education

FYS101

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR

1

ENG103

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I

3

ENG104

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II

3

MTH115 or MTH 103

ELEMENTARY STATISTICS or SURVEY IN MATHEMATICS

3

CIS174

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

3

PSY101

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

3

SOC111

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

3

SCI---

NATURAL SCIENCES ELECTIVE

3

ZZZ---

ARTS AND HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

3

 

Minimum total credits required

61

 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Nicole Kras, Ph.D., C.A.G.S.

Email: nkras@LincolnCollegeNE.edu

Campus Extension: 60927

 

PROGRAM MISSION:

The mission of the human services program is to take an interdisplinary approach to preparing students for employment as human service professionals. Students take academic courses rooted in the social sciences, as well as gain extensive experience through fieldwork at human service agencies. Faculty focus on fostering professional skills in students such as critical thinking, self-awareness, effective communication, and ethical decision making.

PROGRAM COURSES:



HNS100 Introduction to Human Services

3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the field of human services including agencies and career paths, as well as legislation that has an impact on delivering services. This course also provides a historical perspective of the field and how it has evolved to meet the need of modern society.

 

HNS101 Systems, Processes, and Case Management

3 credits

The focus of this course is on case management as a method of human service delivery. Students will develop skills in managing multiple aspects of human service interventions including intake procedures, setting case work goals, monitoring services, etc. The confidentiality of client information and records will be emphasized.

HNS200 Couple, Family, and Group Dynamics

3 credits

This course provides an overview of human interaction systems as they pertain to individual, interpersonal, group, and family dynamics. Theory and analysis are explored in terms of organizational, communal and societal contexts. Emphasis will be placed on the role of diversity as it relates to the systematic development, evaluation, and implementation of direct services for the clinical settings of case management, individual counseling and group facilitation.

Prerequisites: HNS100 or HNS101

HNS210 Interpersonal Communication and Assessment

3 credits

This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. It evaluates Interpersonal Communication in the areas of Communication Techniques, Listening and Comprehension, Giving and Receiving Feedback and Workplace Relationship Etiquette. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills through practical consideration of spontaneous human interaction in face to-face situation; students will learn to apply basic principles of group discussions, utilize active listening, and facilitate effective discussions, paraphrase and nonverbal communication.

Prerequisites: HNS100 or HNS101

HNS212 Human Services Values and Ethics

3 credits

This course is comprised of class discussions, cooperative learning activities, individual assignments, and class presentations. Students complete assignments, which reflect ethical concerns common to human services situations. Professional codes of ethics and the concepts of values, boundaries, morals, and confidentiality within human services professions other professional fields. Students are expected to become familiar with the ethical decision-making process, and to apply these concepts in the class discussions.

Prerequisites: HNS100 or HNS101

HNS213 Management of Human Services

3 credits

This course reviews the many aspects of organizing and managing human service programs. Areas of management that will be covered include leadership, technology, program planning and evaluation, and supervision. Students will also learn and practice the concept of self-supervision.

Prerequisites: HNS100 or HNS101

HNS298 Fieldwork I

3 credits

This course will provide students with an opportunity to work with human service professionals in community organizations. In conjunction with the field experience, students will also explore and discuss the personal and professional attributes necessary to be successful in the human service field.

Prerequisite: Program Director Permission

HNS299 Fieldwork II

3 credits

This course is a continuation of Fieldwork I that will build upon the student’s experience by continuing to work with human services professionals in community organizations and enhance the student’s professional identity in the human services field. Each student will also be required to complete and present a capstone project.

Prerequisite: Program Director Permission

DIRECTED COURSES (Choose 4; subject to availability):

CJS101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits

This course provides a general introduction to the field of criminal justice. In addition to an examination of the effectiveness of the system, history and theories are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the role of law enforcement within the criminal justice system.

 

CJS105 Introduction to Corrections

3 credits

This course provides an overview of the role of incarceration in society. Topics include an examination of physical prison facilities, current treatment theories, sentencing and its goals, and alternatives to incarceration.

PSY103 Exceptional Child

3 credits

This course examines the characteristics, needs, problems, and services available for children who are atypical in some way. Areas of exceptionality studied include: mental, physical, emotional, sensory and social.

Prerequisite: PSY101

PSY210 Developmental Psychology

3 credits

This course explores the social, cognitive, psychomotor, and perceptual changes that are experienced throughout the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the effects of heredity and environment, and how the two interact to impact the developmental progression.

Prerequisite: PSY101

PSY212 Social Psychology

3 credits

This course explores the influence of others on an individual’s social cognition. Attention is given to topics of conformity, aggression, interpersonal relations, stereotyping, and the role of culture.

Prerequisite: PSY101



PSY216 Educational Psychology

3 credits

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the foundations of contemporary education from both a historical and philosophical perspective. Principles of teaching and learning are emphasized.

Prerequisite: PSY101

SOC113 Role of Parenthood

3 credits

This course examines changes in family structure and the effect on parenting. Topics include ways to promote responsibility and maintain self-esteem. Contemporary parenting theories and parenting skills are introduced in the context of parent, caregiver and teacher roles.

SOC200 Contemporary Social Problems

3 credits

In this course, current social problems in the United States such as poverty, crime, inequality, drugs, health issues, population and aging will be discussed. The role of sociology in the analysis and treatment of these problems will be explored.

Prerequisite: SOC111

SOC302 Sociology of Deviance

3 credits

This course presents and overview of concepts, issues and research findings in the sociological study of deviant behavior, how deviance is reacted to and punished in American society. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary theoretical perspectives along with current issues in deviance. Particular forms of deviance including mental illness, juvenile delinquency and interpersonal violence will be examined.

Prerequisite: SOC111

SOC303 Diversity and Multi-culturalism

3 credits

This course examines the concept of “multi-culturalism” through the analysis of anthropological studies and writings. It additionally incorporates theoretical frameworks through which “diversity” as a global concept and phenomenon is explored. The course will be supplemented by the use of film, art and the exploration of ritual, tradition and ideology as it pertains to both American and foreign cultures worldwide.

Prerequisite: SOC111

 

 

 

SOC307 Criminology

3 credits

This course examines the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior and the complexity of crime as a social problem. The course introduces students to the basic theories, fundamental facts and problems associated with science of criminology; focuses on providing a systematic basis for the study of criminals and criminal behavior as related to the criminal justice system. The measurement, techniques of data collection and patterns of crime are explored as well as various classical, biological, psychological and sociological theories of crime causation.

Prerequisite: SOC111

SOC397 Research Methods

3 credits

This course provides an understanding a variety of research methods, including experimental, survey, co-relational and case-history techniques. It offers students an introduction in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches. They will become aware of the strengths and limitations of each method and understand when each method is best used.

Prerequisite: MTH115, PSY101, and 6 Credits of Psychology or Sociology Courses

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES:

FYS101 First-Year Seminar

1 credit

This seminar serves as an introduction to fundamental academic success strategies. The course also provides opportunities for self-awareness that support students through the transition to college. Campus services, career development, and cross-curricular competencies are also covered. This is a graded course and is a requirement for graduation.

ENG103 English Composition I

3 credits

This is a writing-intensive introductory course that emphasizes the writing process, including focus on audiences and purpose in writing, patterns of argument, introductory research, and the review of grammar and mechanics. Both career and academic documents will be assigned, with the goal of learning to write in a professional style, both in college and beyond. Students should expect to produce a total of twelve to fifteen pages of edited writing during the course.

Prerequisite: LCNE Placement exam > 79, ENG097, ENG099 or Co-requisite of ENG099

ENG104 English Composition II

3 credits

Students will build on the skills learned in English 103 to move beyond the basic college essay to writing more complex essays using causal analysis, persuasion, and argument. This course will focus on reading complex texts, and using the research skills introduced in English 103 to develop, research, write and revise a full-length research paper. Class assignments and discussion will focus on introducing, reinforcing, and emphasizing critical thinking skills in a multi-cultural environment.

Prerequisite: ENG103

MTH115 Elementary Statistics

3 credits

This course introduces the elementary statistical procedures used by researchers in the behavioral, health, and social science professions and other related disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of tables, graphs and elementary descriptive statistical applications. The course also introduces the student to the sampling and surveying done in many everyday life experiences.

Prerequisite: MTH098 or >79 on Elementary Algebra Placement Test

CIS174 Computer Applications

3 credits

This course provides a hands-on overview of computer applications utilizing particular software with emphasis on computer use for business purposes. Word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software projects are included. Students develop a logical approach to problem-solving in relation to storing, retrieving, and analyzing information for reports and projects. Problems and issues related to computer-based information systems are discussed.

 

 

PSY101 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles underlying mental and behavioral processes, biopsychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory, and language. In addition, research methodology, psychopathology and treatments are discussed.

SOC111 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of society and an analysis of the relationships of people to family, religion, education, politics, economics, and community. Changes in society and an individual’s influence on society are emphasized.

SCI---

Natural Science elective

3 credits

 

ZZZ---

Arts and Humanities elective

3 credits

Important information about the educational debt, earnings, and completion rates of students who attended Lincoln College of New England and enrolled in this program can be found at:
http://www.lincolncollegene.edu/southington-college-campus/student-consumer-info  

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